Tag Archives: Winemaking

Wandering through Germany: Part 1 – Pfalz

Earlier this year I went on a trip to visit some of the German wine regions. I was in Germany for a work trip supporting our European sales team and decided to do a speedy tour through as many regions as I could during 3 personal days I took at the end of my trip. It was an amazing experience which I was fortunate enough to share with my friend and (at the time) fellow MW student, Martin Reyes.

We visited the Rhine, Pfalz, and my personal favorite, the Mosel.

I was extremely impressed with the quality present in the Rhine and Pfalz. Clearly we don’t get the good stuff in the US! In Pfalz we visited two wineries, Weingut Knipser and Geoge Mosbacher, both of whom changed my idea of wines outside of the Mosel which admittedly I have had a very, very small sample set up until this visit.

Weingut Knipser

 At Weingut Knipser we were hosted by Volker Knipser who was enlightening, not just for the wines but also for his eloquent statements which I felt driven to write down.

On Brands: “We are not a region for brands. Our name is our brand. You can be sure if you have a Knipser you have a good wine.”

On Reputation: “You can only work on your name. That is all you have!” – I could not agree more!

On Terrior: “ Wine is a mosaic. The site is a part of the picture but also important is what you plant, how you train, and what grows. The cellar, not so much but the producer is important.”

Their 2011 Blauer Spatburgunder was amazingly elegant and aromatic made from native yeasts. “If you are looking for body, look to other varieties” – Volker Knipser on Spatburgunder (Pinot Noir). I was starting to think this guy is a genius!

The 2009 GG (Große Gewächse meaning “Great growth” or the German equivalent of Grand Cru) Mandelpfad Spatburgunder was amazing! Super aromatic with lovely soft supple tannins and fresh acid.

At Gerog Mosbacher we were treated to a lovely tour and tasting of some amazing Rieslings. Of course a super friendly winery dog accompanied us on all of our wanderings here.

Georg Mosbacher Pfalz sm

Here the current proprietors, Jürgen Düringer and Sabine Mosbacher-Düringer were our hosts. They were incredibly enlightening on the German wine classification system which was still completely greek to me until this point and the VDP’s (Verband Deutscher Prädikats or the German Quality Winegrowers Association) role in German wines. If you are a wine person, particuarly a Riesling person then it would probably seem that the VDP own most of the acreage in Germany however according to Sabine only 4% of the wineries in Germany belong to the VDP. They are invited to join by consensus of current group members. We tried several Rieslings grown on three different soils; Sandstone, Soils from near the forest, and Calcarious soils. The Sandstone had a decidely mineral flavor with lemon-lime hints, orange blossom, pear and apricot. The near forest soils had very sweet fruit, light minerality, apricot and grapefruit. The Calcarious soils were zesty and more linear in focus with sweet hay and very ripe apricot flavors.

2012 Deidsheimer Mäushöhle Riesling Trocken (Sandstone)

2012 Forester Musenhang Riesling Trocken (Near the Forest)

2012 Wachenheimer Gerümpel Riesling (Calcarious)

We also had a fantastic discussion regarding the aroma of petrol in Riesling. Jürgen weighed in on this and stated that his opinion was that Petrol showing up within the first 2 years is definitively a fault in the winemaking process that comes from high pressure in the press and a high level of phenolics in the juice. However if it shows up after the wine is 10 years old it is the normal Petrol aroma of an aged Riesling. He also stated that atypical aging disorders come from sunburn, drought years or green phenolics from un-ripe years.

It was truly fascinating stuff!

Their top two wines were the following

2012 Pechstein GG (Basalt soil) – Stone and Chalk

A Very mineral driven, rich palate with linear acid which is almost Mosel in style. Lime zest and flinty characters on the nose and palate.

2012 Ungeheurer GG – Zesty and Fruity

Ripe apricot, melon and cantaloupe with light minerality and ripe, rich fruit on the palate with a concentrated long finish.

Stay tuned next week for Part 2 – Rhine!

Georg Mosbacher cellar Pfalz

Harvest 2014: Week 10 – Rounding Up the Stragglers

 

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Like a duck gliding slowly, wings spread wide, feet reaching for landing on a pond, we are coming to the end of an incredibly fast harvest.  Last week we saw extreme temperatures.  Extreme cold in the mid 40s and extreme heat in the mid 90s.  I have seen some vineyards in Calistoga with frost damage at this point and that only reconfirms my belief that the season is coming to a close.  We have about a week an a half left of harvest at the winery to bring in all the remaining fruit.  It is mostly Bordeaux varieties with one lone block of Chardonnay down in Carneros that routinely takes its sweet time ripening.

The theme of this year has been low extractability.  We are having to work extremely hard to extract what color and flavors are in the skins.  Maybe that is a result of the drought.  Maybe the skins are thicker and harder due to the lack of water.  However, this was not the case last year which was also a drought year.  Quality looks good.  We are just having to work harder to keep it than in 2013.  It also seems to be a year of slow yeast.  Very few fermentations are “finishing strongly” with most going well until 3 or 4 Brix then slowing down to a crawl to the finish line.

For myself, I’ve signed up for a 10K on November 9th in Calistoga.  I wanted something to look forward to and work towards now that the Master of Wine program is no longer in my life.  Personally, I really can’t stand running.  I much prefer dancing, Pilates, Yoga, or even biking to running.  However, if I want to push myself I can’t stick with the easy stuff.  I have to motivate myself to do it.  Unfortunately my training has been hindered by an fateful run in with a tick sometime last month and fighting the resulting infection that may potentially be Lyme disease.  Why am I posting this? One, if one person who reads this blog remembers to check for the beastly buggers after wandering around in the outdoors it was worth it. Two, I believe in being open, honest, and fully authentic.  In this blog I’m not only writing about wine and winemaking but also its affect on my life.  Fortunately and unfortunately, one of the requirements of the job is being outdoors much of the year with all the highs and lows that come with that.  I’m under good care and well on my way to making a full recovery however prayers are always appreciated!

Stay safe my friends!

Harvest 2014: Week 9 – So Where Are We Going to Put That?

After the events of last week, my thoughts are that we are pretty much finished with the normal ripening process for this harvest.  We had another rain storm that dropped an additional 1/2 in of rain on Calistoga and thunderstorms on Friday that brought a massive hail storm and lightning to the valley.  Luckily it doesn’t seem that any fruit was severely damaged from the hail but all the moisture in the air has started to take its toll and some of the green mold that comes with rain is starting to show up.  The canopies look tired and the vines have fully lignified signaling their start towards dormancy.

When one looks around the valley more often than not the vineyards are picked now and slowly turning to the beautiful yellow of fall.  Harvest now becomes a logistics game.  Who has tanks?  Who has crews to pick? Who has trucks to haul the fruit if the first two questions are met with answers.  With the rain during week 7, some of the high Brix that we had been seeing went backwards a bit so we aren’t going to be seeing the incredibly high brix harvest that I had feared.  Flavor concentration still looks good so that is a blessing.

I couldn’t help but think about anyone doing dessert wines because I bet this year would be stellar for botrytis and combined with the ripe fruit concentration that was reached before the rain, it has the potential to be a fantastic year for desserts.  I’ll have to reach out to my winemaking buddy and dessert specialist, Roger Harrison, to get his take on it.

Some growers are already seeing the end to their season while for the rest the end is almost in sight.  I can see the light at the end of the tunnel and barring any major fermentation issues this harvest should wrap up smoothly and very early.