Tag Archives: Viticulture

Harvest 2014: Week 8 – What Do Harvest and Home Renovation Have in Common?

Harvest is racing along now.  With the rain last week (0.25″ in Calistoga) and the threat of yet another storm this week bringing the same amount or more on Wednesday and Thursday, we are starting to make triage calls.  This can hang, that needs to come in, etc… This may be our last week of whites, leaving only the Bordeaux reds hanging out.  Quite a few of our reserve blocks came in last week with the balance coming in early this week (planned before the rain so excellent timing on To Kalon’s part!)

At home we are still working on our Master Bathroom.  The drywall is going up today and tomorrow and the tile installation will start on Friday.  It is going to be great but with our hard work over the weekend it got me thinking about the ways that both home installation and harvest are similar.

1) Both are weather dependent.  The moisture in the air causes drywall mud to cure more slowly as well as thin set on tile so it slows down the process even if it is dry in the house.  Same is true of moisture with harvest.  Rain brings harvest to a halt completely and excess moisture slows down the ripening process and can cause rot (luckily we haven’t seen any major issues this year!).

2) Both feel like they take FOREVER! When you are in the midst of a crazy project or harvest it seems like it has been going on a LONG time and the end is no where in sight.

3) But when they are over you look back and think “That wasn’t so bad.” It seems like such a fun thing in hindsight that you forget the lost sleep, the setbacks, the sluggish tanks, the blown reno budget, and just appreciate what all your hard work has given you.  Amazing wine and hopefully an amazing bathroom!

4) Both are super exciting to plan.  I love picking out tile and vanities.  I also love selecting the next blocks and putting them on the schedule.  It is the best feeling in the world when you have a tank that stubbornly doesn’t want to finish fermentation yet you are somehow able to coax the yeast out of their funk and get it to go dry.  There is no better feeling than that!

5) Both need the little wins celebrated.  When we finished the demo of the bathroom this weekend it was a mess.  I HATE drywall dust.  Seriously! However, as my husband and I were sweeping it all up I realized that we had reached a critical point in our project.  The point where you stop tearing apart and start putting back together.  At this point, we are over 50% finished with the fruit that is scheduled to come into the winery.  That is also a tipping point.  We have started down the home stretch and while it seems like it will be a dramatic finish with the high sugars and the early rains, there is a light at the end of the tunnel now.

As to the rains, I welcome them.  We desperately need them.  We need rain more than we need a stellar vintage right now however I definitely don’t think these few small rainstorms will have a detrimental effect at this point.  We are not looking at another 2011 simply because in 2011 we were struggling to reach 24 Brix.  This year it seems like we will be very lucky if our average Brix stays at 26-27.  We could use some more hang time so bring on the cool weather and the rain! The Cabernet can take it!

In a Winemaker’s Shoes

This week we are in the middle of bloom. Normally I would be happy about that but this bloom shows the first portends of a challenging vintage. The bloom is not even. There are some clusters with full bloom while others are still tightly closed on the same vine. Below is a picture of full bloom in Merlot

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The weather has also been less than ideal. Rain last Thursday night and cool, windy conditions are not ideal for an excellent set. This may be a blessing in disguise however. The flower clusters that are out there are big. Large wings and long primary clusters. Here is some Cabernet in Monastery Block of To Kalon.

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In the meantime, I’ve decided to retire my boots. This has been the absolute best pair of boots I’ve ever had. Winemaking is hard on boots. They have to tromp through vineyards, up and down hills, in both wet and dry conditions then come into the winery only to be covered in grape pumace and splashed with wine. Mine have the added requirement of dealing with a house renovation and running after an 18 month old. I bought them for the 2010 vintage and they have lasted me through 2011, 2012, and 2013. I, of course, went out and bought the exact same shoe. I knew I had worn them down but until I compared the two pairs I had no idea how much. Here are the comparison pics below.

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Apparently I’ve asked a lot from my shoes and these have delivered. Who knows how many miles they have walked but I look forward to seeing how many miles I can get out of the new pair!>

Seven Reasons Everyone Should Pray For Rain!

We need water. We REALLY NEED it very bad! During the whole of last year we only saw around 6 inches of rain when average is around 40 inches or so. San Francisco got just over 5 inches which is getting into desert-type conditions. So far this year, the picture has not improved much. We had a sprinkle of rain (0.01 inch) a few weeks ago but that was it.
The culprit is a high pressure system that has been parked off of the Pacific coast for several months redirecting the rain we usually see down to Mexico. Time magazine recently announced they believe we are moving into an El Niño year meaning a super warm year for the west coast. While they are the only people proclaiming this so far, that on top of a drought year could mean an extremely challenging vintage for grape growers.
1) Low rain and warmer than average winter means early bud break.
2) Early bud break plus extremely dry conditions means a nasty frost season.
3) A bad frost season and low water supplies means that those growers that rely on overhead sprinklers for frost protection have to chose to protect the crop now and risk not having enough water to irrigate later when the summer comes.
4) Low water resources and a warm year means increased irrigation needs further stressing already stressed water supplies.
5) Further stress on already stressed water supplies means agriculture and urban water needs are put at odds once again. That battle is usually won by the urbanites.
6) Reduction of water for agriculture means less crops over all. Lower yields for wine grapes and food crops alike.
7) Lower yields for crops equals higher food prices to the end consumer.
When I say “we need water” I don’t just mean those of us who make our living in Agriculture. I mean ALL of us, collectively.
In all seriousness, start praying for rain. We REALLY need it!