Tag Archives: Napa

Pruning

This week I found time to get out in To Kalon and work a bit. The fastest way to get to know a vineyard is to work in it. Moving through the rows with steady purpose and rhythmic cutting you start to get a feel for the strong and weak areas. The undulating rises and dips in the ground where frost or water may settle at various times in the season. I only had time for a little but so I started in Monastery with our vineyard manager Matt Ashby.

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This particular block of Monastery is Reserve Sauvignon Blanc that is spur pruned and cordon trained.

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We’re leaving two buds per spur so that there will be two fruitful shoots this next season per position.

When you are pruning you take between 90-95% of last years growth off. I’ve taken a before and after shot below.

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This was my first time pruning To Kalon. It’s a little daunting knowing what this vineyard is capable of but you still have to make the cuts reasonably fast. I found out two things; I still know what cuts to make but I’m A LOT slower than I used to be when I was pruning more often. Good pruners can prune close to or above 100 vines per hour. I was around 30 vines per hour which is embarrassingly pathetic from where I was three springs ago when I pruned last. It just goes to show you, if you don’t use it you lose it! The vines are bleeding profusely so budbreak will be shortly upon us and with it the beginning of my vintage note updates for 2014!

It’s Premier Napa Valley Week Y’all!!

One of the great things that we get to experience living in the Napa Valley are the amazing events put on throughout the year including Premier Napa Valley and Auction Napa Valley both put on by the Napa Valley Vintners. It’s so exciting to be able to be in the crowds and feel the excitement. It’s also extremely rewarding as a winemaker to get instant feedback from others about your wines. For Robert Mondavi Winery, we’ve entered a 20 case lot. That means in the winery we go through days of blending for a wine that will only add up to a little less than a barrel. It is a SUPER small amount but still approached as seriously as any of our other blends. Each one is important!
My week doesn’t really get going until Friday afternoon when the Oakville growers descend on Far Niente. Doors open at 3pm and the event runs until 6pm. I’ll be there the whole time so be sure to say hi. The main event so to speak is the lot tasting and auction on Saturday at the CIA Greystone. This is exciting for multiple reasons. A) it’s hard not to get caught up in the excitement of an auction. B) I get a chance to taste other wines from the valley. It’s a great opportunity to see what everyone else is doing as well as to get feel for how the valley as a whole is presenting itself to the world. Finally C) It’s a great time to catch up with old friends and make new ones. I’ll be rotating between pouring at the Robert Mondavi Winery station (#13 if memory serves me correctly) with the rest of the team and tasting throughout the room. The only downside? Cell service is spotty at the CIA. Must be all that stone architecture. Therefore, there won’t be much tweeting from me even though there will be plenty to tweet about.

I hope everyone has a great time and I’ll see you there!

On another note, vintage 2014 is quietly beginning

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The newly pruned vines on To Kalon were bleeding this morning!

Seven Reasons Everyone Should Pray For Rain!

We need water. We REALLY NEED it very bad! During the whole of last year we only saw around 6 inches of rain when average is around 40 inches or so. San Francisco got just over 5 inches which is getting into desert-type conditions. So far this year, the picture has not improved much. We had a sprinkle of rain (0.01 inch) a few weeks ago but that was it.
The culprit is a high pressure system that has been parked off of the Pacific coast for several months redirecting the rain we usually see down to Mexico. Time magazine recently announced they believe we are moving into an El NiƱo year meaning a super warm year for the west coast. While they are the only people proclaiming this so far, that on top of a drought year could mean an extremely challenging vintage for grape growers.
1) Low rain and warmer than average winter means early bud break.
2) Early bud break plus extremely dry conditions means a nasty frost season.
3) A bad frost season and low water supplies means that those growers that rely on overhead sprinklers for frost protection have to chose to protect the crop now and risk not having enough water to irrigate later when the summer comes.
4) Low water resources and a warm year means increased irrigation needs further stressing already stressed water supplies.
5) Further stress on already stressed water supplies means agriculture and urban water needs are put at odds once again. That battle is usually won by the urbanites.
6) Reduction of water for agriculture means less crops over all. Lower yields for wine grapes and food crops alike.
7) Lower yields for crops equals higher food prices to the end consumer.
When I say “we need water” I don’t just mean those of us who make our living in Agriculture. I mean ALL of us, collectively.
In all seriousness, start praying for rain. We REALLY need it!