Category Archives: Tasting Notes

Two Nights of Kinship at Kindred Fare

  One of the things Brian and I miss most about living in Napa is the wide variety of amazing food available there.  It was always a struggle to decide, when we were going to go out, where we should go because there were so many great choices, many of which did not need reservations 6 months in advance.  So of course, when a new restaurant in the Finger Lakes comes on our radar we have got to go check it out.

I had heard great things about Kindred Fare in Geneva, NY from many of my friends so I decided to try it, sight unseen, last week with visiting colleagues from San Francisco.  It was a Tuesday night and the crowd was full but not packed which was a good sign.  The wine list is a nice mix of local stars and global examples of mostly cool climate wines which are complementary to the restaurant’s farm to table offerings.  The list is curated by Bob Madill, a local fixture here in the region, likely best known as a tireless Finger Lakes ambassador and one of the founders of Cayuga lake treasure, Sheldrake Point Winery, who is currently working with Glenora.  My colleagues had never visited the area before and I felt that this restaurant, representing the rising foodie scene in Geneva plus their local wine offerings would be a perfect introduction.

  The kitchen sent out an amuse bouche of baked potato with two cheeses which was a lovely start to the meal.  For our appetizer we ordered the flatbread which had braised duck, caramelized onions, and delicious melted cheese topping a fantastic flatbread crust.  It was wonderful.  To pair, we chose the Ravines Single Vineyard Chardonnay (Stone and Chalk) from the White Springs vineyard.  To choose a Riesling would be obvious, but at this point, even the farthest wine lover here in the US has heard that we make good Riesling here.  Chardonnay from the Finger Lakes was an unknown to my two friends so it was a good choice to demonstrate the versatility of the region.

All three of us happened to be duck lovers so we each chose the Roast Duck with plum sriracha, mushroom, bok choy, peanuts, cilantro, and daikon-carrot pickles.  To pair we chose the Red Newt Glacier Ridge Pinot Noir (Elegant and Floral).  This one was exciting for me since I had just finished espousing my passion for Pinot Noir in the Finger Lakes and although many that I taste currently are not where they need to be yet, this one was showing very well and complemented the duck completely.  Yes, we were the three duck table! Dessert was a fantastic bread pudding which is one of my personal favorites.

I immediately went home and began talking about the dinner with Brian and how amazing it was.  As a twist of fate would have it, my mother in law was in town due to my son being sick that week and with him having to stay home from school, we needed backup.  She, always a fan of date nights, suggested that we should go out ourselves the next night.  Thus, I ended up walking back into Kindred Fare the very next night for a second fantastic dinner.  This time we tried the Boundary Breaks clone 239 Riesling (Zesty and Fruity) which was delicious and highlighted everything that I love about the variety.  It was a bit more sweet than expected but still went well with the meal which started off with a mixed bread basket and house made chunky style hummus.

I chose one of the nightly specials, the Coq a Vin (Roast Chicken with red wine based sauce) with various roasted vegitables.  Brian got the Braised beef shank goulash which was a meal choice that I had toyed with both nights that I had been there.  According to him, the meat fell apart at the touch of a fork and had a kick but was not overly spicy (that is why I didn’t order it myself since I try to stay far away from anything with heat spice).  It was mouthwateringly good.  We finished off dinner each with ice cream.  I chose Blood Orange and Brian chose Chicory.  Both were amazing but after the first taste swap neither of us were keen to share.

That is how I ended up two nights in a row at one of Geneva’s newest foodie destinations and I am actually contemplating going back this Friday as well.  Amazing food can be found in the Finger Lakes if one is willing to drive a bit to find it.  I find myself a bit envious of my friends in Geneva, which has become ground zero for the culinary revolution happening here, since they are so close to the action.  I highly recommend a visit to Kindred Fare if you happen to be in the region!



Bordeaux 2011: Vintage Review

This past week, at the culmination of the Master of Wine seminar, the Institute of the Masters of Wine held their annual Bordeaux tasting.  This year focused on the 2011 vintage.  After the spectacular back to back successes of 2009 and 2010, 2011 brought a challenging year but also a year where the individual communes could show their classic styles.

Weather Recap
The spring started off a bit on the early side and rapidly warmed up to the second warmest April on record.  May followed suit and also was quite dry causing an early flowering.  Drought conditions early in the year can cause difficulties later in the season if enough water is not available to the vine during the time just after flowering.  This period of the year is called the “cell division and expansion phase” and allows the vine to set the number of cells that will make up the grape later in the season.  If not enough water is available during this phase the berries can remain quite small which, if water becomes available later in the season can cause splitting and exacerbate rot.  Drought conditions during this phase can also affect shoot growth and leaf development which may result in the vine being out of balance.

June of 2011 in Bordeaux was equally problematic due to a severe heat spike which resulted in early sunburn on many vineyards.  Sunburn damages the cells of the grape skins and results in reduced color and flavor formation.  Late season sunburn can also result in cooked flavors however this was not the case since July rapidly cooled and the rains returned leading some estates to worry about rot.  Additional large rainstorms in September caused many estates to pick earlier than usual further exacerbating an already difficult year.  As always, those producers willing to make the rigorous cuts in fruit selection were able to make good wines.  Here are my impressions from the various regions.


Still quite a ripe style of wines over the producers I tasted.  Not as intense as 2009 or 2010 however some black fruit is evident, more so than most of the other communes.  The tannins were characteristically gravelly over all and the mid palate was missing some of the generosity of the previous two vintages.  Overall a classic representation of the area.

St. Emillion

St. Emillion was showing its very structured, slightly blocky tannins and quite a bit more cassis and dry herb notes than the past two years, clearly reflecting the cool season post veraison.  For my tastes, I definitely preferred its neighbor Pomerol for the 2011 vintage.


Pomerol still showed the lush mid-palate weight that it is known for relative to St. Emillion however 2011 was a more classic vintage for the region than the previous two.  The minerality of the old world is back and was something I had found missing in the uber ripe previous two vintages.  The texture of tannin was chunky and the Merlot dominant blends were clearly apparent when compared to the more fine grained tannins of the Left bank.

Haut Medoc

Granitic minerality with focused cassis and dry herb characters but only modest mid-palate weight and structure.

St. Estephe

Quite lean mid palate and high, fine grained tannins.  Lots of cassis but some black cherry and wet granite as well.  These definitely need time to soften.

St. Jullien

This commune was my favorite for the vintage.  The elegance of the styles complemented the classic beauty of this vintage and the wines showed very well integrated oak balanced with beautifully textured, fine grained tannins.  These wines stood out as having the most affinity for the cool end of the season and the lovely texture of the wines reflected winemaking that embraced the vintage rather than working against it.


The most surprising of the communes I tasted since there seemed to have been little regard for what 100% new oak would taste like over the natural flavors of such a classic and restrained vintage.  In many of the producers I tasted, the oak was dominant and overpowered the more delicate fruit.  Maybe with time, this will integrate further however I am not convinced it will resolve.


A lovely showing for Margaux.  Although the perfume of the commune was not as apparent in this vintage, the tannins were powerful and refined with a velvety texture which complemented the highly concentrated mid-palate.  Of all the communes, Margaux seemed to have retained the most concentration on the palate and the ripest fruit profile showing blueberries and black cherries.  The elegant style and mineral notes still clearly said old world however, which is a welcome change from the riper styles of the previous two vintages.  These wines are evolving beautifully and should show classic complexity in the years to come.

Of course, much of the wines that were tasted are classed growths with the means to handle a challenging vintage and come out on the other side with a classically elegant wine.  This means that the widespread deliciousness of the 2009 and 2010 vintages will be restricted to those estates with the means to be very selective and I would choose from the non-classed wineries very selectively.  It’s a good year to know the history of the producers.  If they were able to make a good or great wine in 2007, it is likely that they would be able to repeat the performance from the 2011 vintage.

Wine Bloggers Conference 2015: White Wine Speed Dating from the Finger Lakes

Yesterday, we participated in the equivalent of speed dating with white wines of the Finger Lakes.  The notes below were on the fly with 5 minutes to taste and talk with the winemaker of each wine so it is completely stream of consciousness.  Please excuse the rambling sentences.

Lucas 2014 Semi Dry Riesling – Zesty and Fruity

Ripe peach, tangerine, apricot, medium intensity, Fresh bright acid and nice balance with about 20g/L RS from my palate (not tasting notes), med alcohol. Very nice wine.

Nice growing year. Oldest winery on Cayuga lake. Tree fruit aromas, apricot typical from Riesling on Cayuga. 3rd generation winery. 100% Riesling.

Hermann J Weimer 2009 Blanc de Blanc – Light and Bubbly

100% Chardonnay, barrel fermented, neutral oak, 4.5 years in Tirage, disgorged Jan 2015. 6.5g/L dosage

Moderate autolysis, some light brioche, bright fruit, warmth, no chalky minerality like you would see from Champagne but very similar to top cool climate new world wines from Tasmania. $40 retail so it’s a steal! Full body and very rich.

Villa Bellangelo 2013 Semi-Dry Riesling – Stone and Chalk

Very intense minerality with wet stone and lime zest. Totally different profile from the Lucas. 20% Botrytis fruit. Rich palate and intense character, very complex. Very nice balance with crisp acid and 25g/L RS. Lovely! $18 retail again a steal!

Chateau Franc Celebre Riesling “Cremant” Sparkling Wine NV – Light and Bubbly

Very minerally, slightly cheesy, moderately intense nose, Traditional method, hand harvested, Tank fermented primary and 2nd ferment in bottle around 15 months of tirage. Everything is hand disgorged so some wines see longer. Vintage wines are 4 years in tirage. Nice balance, crisp acid and more indicative of a cool climate in the acid than the Weimer above. Different profile. 30g/L RS balances a 2.9 pH. Ideal range for the winemaker is 2.9-3.1. Fine beads. $21.00 Retail.

Red Newt Wine Cellars 2013 Dry Riesling – Stone and Chalk

Slight gunflint, chalk, and wet stone. Lime zest and white peach. 6g/L RS but plenty of body for a fruity round balanced finish. Long fermentation in tank and then 6-7 months on lees after primary. $17.00.

Glenora Gewurztraminer Seneca Lake 2014 – Zesty and Fruity

Bacon fat and Rose petals. Hey don’t knock it until you try it. Very fruity on the palate, rich texture. Rounded finish as is typical of Gewurtz with 6.7 g/L TA and 3.58 pH. Overnight skin contact then settled and fermented with DV-10. Interesting mix of savory and fruity.

Hunt Country Vineyards 2013 Vidal Blanc Ice Wine – Sweet and Luscious

Pulling out all the personalities today! Golden color and intensely fruity nose. Thick, viscous palate, and long finish. If you have a sweet tooth you’ll like this wine. Not quite as intense in character as some of the Niagara wines that I’ve tasted but very lovely and delicate flavors.

Standing Stone 2013 Gewurztraminer – Zesty and Fruity

Very savory and fruty with Lychee and ripe apricot flavors. Intense fruit on the nose and very nice palate with a slight phenolic finish that leaves a pleasant texture. Moderately low acid but not heavy. $14 price point. Again crazy low prices. Compared to Alsace it has less oiliness but just as pretty.

Fox Run Vineyards Reserve Riesling 2011 Seneca Lake – Stone and Chalk

Intense nose and very complex palate. Delicious! Chalky, ripe apricot, wet stone on the nose. Moderately sweet on the palate with fresh crisp acid balancing the fruitiness. Not cloying or heavy. Perfectly balanced. Lovely wine.

Fulkerson Winery 2014 Gruner Veltliner Seneca Lake – Stone and Chalk

Moderately intense nose of white pepper and dry herbs ending in lime zest. Slight minerality and citrusy flavors on the palate. Lovely acid balance with light refreshing body.