Category Archives: General Digression

What Do You Do with Leftover Wine?

This is a subject very near and dear to my heart.  Even though I make my living making wine and being surrounded by the alcohol industry, I am not a particularly frequent drinker.  I’ll have 2-3 glasses per week with only one of those typically being on a week night.  Most people are surprised by this.  However, this usually means that I have partial bottles that are open when my husband and I get the urge to open something. Then we are torn as to what to do with the leftover wine.  Inevitably whenever someone brings this question up the industry jokes follow.

“What’s leftover wine?”
“We don’t have that problem in MY house!”

Let’s face it. From a health perspective, unless we have 3-4 people with whom we are sharing the wine a typical bottle should last more than one day.  This is something that is an issue for our industry but so often it gets swept under the rug and having “leftover wine” is something that is ridiculed and laughed at.  So here we go.  Here are two options for wine lovers who want to open those special bottles but don’t want to worry about finishing it before the inevitable exposure to oxygen starts to degrade the wine.

 

The first is called Private Preserve (Buy it here on Amazon.com).  This is one I’ve used for years and is a mix of CO2, Nitrogen, and Argon, three gasses which are very common in wineries.  It is a must have for making white wines at home in carboys and really works well for keeping wines that have been opened from going bad.  I purchased the bottle in this photo two years ago.

“We are starting this journey by reducing the $1.27B of wine that is poured down the drain at home, plus the additional 18-24M bottles dumped at restaurants.” – Ryan Federickson, General manager of ArT-18

The second is called ArT18 Wine Preservation System (Buy it here from the company’s website).  This one is pure Argon and does go farther than the average bottle of Private Preserve because of that.  This one is new to me and was sent to me as a sample to test. Ryan Frederickson, General manager of ArT-18 Wine says “The company I founded has a mission to decrease waste using sustainable technology.  We intend to take this technology to food preservation. We launched ArT Wine Preservation this past December with an engineering background in the argon industry.”

To tested both head to head I had the perfect opportunity when I hosted several fellow MW students who wanted to work on their Practical Exam skills.  I put 3 full mock exams together (36 wines total) ranging from $6.00 per bottle to close to $200.00.  We gassed each of the wines after the exams with one of the two products.  The mock exam weekend was about a month ago and I have been slowly opening the bottles to try them over the past month.

Long story short, both work really well.  Even this evening, after a month a half full bottle of 2010 Haut Medoc  was fresh and very drinkable.  The one wine that did not do well under the preserving gas was a 2003 Gevrey-Chambertin 1er Cru.  Admittedly this one tasted a bit over the hill when it was just opened but after two days under the gas it had started growing a film yeast like coating and going very south flavor wise.  Even the floral white wines which stayed under gas and open in our fridge for 2 weeks were still fresh and drinkable.  The reds we left on our counter with the corks stuck in the bottles and continued to sample them and then re-gas over the past month.

“Even the floral white wines which stayed under gas and open in our fridge for 2 weeks were still fresh and drinkable.”

In conclusion, we should never feel like we need to finish a bottle of wine in one sitting just so it doesn’t go to waste.  With these two home gassing methods, wines can stay fresh for a long period of time and you never have to worry about opening too many bottles to try.

Coloring Outside the Lines: Why Winemaker’s Shouldn’t Color to Relax

Adult coloring books seem to be a strong trend lately.  For my birthday this year, I found four of them on my desk complete with colored pencils and crayons from an anonymous co-worker.  I took the hint and tried it out.  Below was my first attempt.

What began as an innocent coloring project immediately struck a nerve with my somewhat OCD tendencies.  Why I started with a blue flower, I have no idea, but ultimately it ended up stressing me out completely as I tried to balance the colors to not have any one color be dominant.  It also doesn’t seem to have any cohesive pattern so finding the patterns within the patterns while it was still black and white really didn’t become apparent until I was almost finished with the entire page.  Then there was the pattern underneath the pattern which looked a little bit to me like satin quilting so I tried to get artistic with shadowing and shading and it just ended up looking a bit demonic rather than the plush satin texture that I was intending. The result which is a strange chaotic mess, in my eyes, is why as a winemaker I always have a plan to start.  I always envision what the wine should look like at the end so that every step along the way has a purpose and a direction.  This picture continues to stress me out just looking at it now but even as stressed as I was, I was driven to finish it.  To see if, after everything started out strange and wrong, I could pull it back to something interesting.  There are many times I’ve had to do the same thing as a winemaker and it is no where near as relaxing as an easy ferment but the sense of accomplishment at the end is a good feeling.

The next one I planed out.  It was a page full of leaves in black and white.  Not wanting to do an entire page of green, I devised a story behind it to be right at the end of summer when it turns to fall and that first leaf starts to turn yellow and orange.  I picked the changing leaf and then worked on coloring in the balance of them with two shades of green in various shading patterns depending on leaf overlap.  The result, unfortunately pictured sideways here since it was colored in landscape, was a relaxing study of leaves which had a clear plan.  So note to self, if I don’t have a plan ahead of time, don’t start the drawing.  The chaos of the non-plan will cancel out any relaxing benefits of the physical act of coloring.

Finding Time to Write

Now that I’m back in the MW program,quotes on writing:quotes on writing pick up a pen and write I remember why I always had such a hard time getting weekly posts up. It’s so hard to find time to write. I only have so much time set aside during the week and with two assignments due last week it was maxed out.

I want to find time to write, however life seems to happen so quickly and there are so many things that need to be written. Blog posts, MW assignments, tasting notes, harvest notes, and the book I’ve been meaning to start on. There are so many hours in the day and outside of getting up at 5am to write (which I will probably need to start doing soon) I don’t have many options with a 3 year old at home.

Writing is Rewarding

Anyway, I write today, not to complain about my lack of time for writing but to share with you all the fun opportunities that I have to do so. Writing this blog is one of the most rewarding things. I am so excited when someone says they read it. It makes all the time and effort worth it that others care what I have to say; something that constantly amazes me. I am also thrilled at being able to write MW assignments again. Crazy? Probably. I’m accepting that and moving on in my nutzo state. There are three years of MW exam theory questions I haven’t written yet so I need to get on those so I can say I’ve written the last 15 years of exam questions instead of only the years of 2001-2012.  Now where is my fishbowl???

I keep meaning to write up the vintage notes for 2015 because by the time you need them for tasting notes you’ve generally forgotten what happened during the vintage. I have little post it notes around the house from weather events and harvest dates for each of the wines I made this year that stare at me accusingly for not sitting down and writing them up.  Then there is my book idea.  I’m not even sure it is a fully formed idea yet but my thought was to sit down and start writing and see what it turns into.  My best ideas generally start this way but I need time to see how it will go.  This is last on my priority list right now with at least 500 other things in front of it daily.

“If you have other things in your life—family, friends, good productive day work—these can interact with your writing and the sum will be all the richer.”
– David Brin

So back onto the crazy train I go with the MW work.  My day job is challenging and rewarding.  My family life is good but exhausting as it should be.  I have lots of great subject matter to write about.  Now if only I can find the time…