Harvest 2018 Update

This has been an insane year.  I haven’t had much time to post at all which I’m incredibly disappointed by.  However, the 2018 harvest is shaping up to be a very interesting one.  Over the summer, my family and I relocated back to Napa, California but we are keeping our brand, Trestle Thirty One, from the Finger Lakes in upstate NY.  This requires me to keep on top of harvests on both coasts.  I’ll try to catch everyone up on what has happened so far.

Napa

It’s so similar to 2010 it is scary.  In 2010, the summer was mild with very few hot days post veraison with the one exception of right before labor day when all the Pinot Noir I was working with decided to jump 4 Brix over the span of a few days.  The color development was phenomenal and the whites and early ripening red vineyards had such incredible finesse, high acids, and intensely chunky tannins.  Early rains in October changed the mood and late ripening red vineyards struggled to reach maturity.  2010 was also when Brian and I bought our house in Calistoga and started renovations which would last 5 years.  We moved in around mid October and were harvesting and trying to get unpacked at the same time.

So here we are in 2018 with a mild summer with few heat spikes (minus the labor day heat that 2010 had), amazing whites with fresh acid, elegant Pinot Noir, and early Cabernets are showing color that is off the charts, low pHs, and lots of flavor and tannin stuffing.  We had almost 1.25 inches of rain last week however which soaked the vineyards and made me thankful I had brought my muckboots with me.  Ripening has slowed considerably and after an early run of fruit, the season has been achingly slow although quality is still amazing.  Just like 2010, the first rain was not really an issue.  It’s the second rain now that could cause problems.  It may be that mother nature will smile on us with a long and calm season.  Today was spectacular in Napa with plenty of wind to dry out any remaining wet spots.  With the heat tomorrow, I expect to see a wave of movement in maturity and predict the week of October 15th and 22nd will be VERY busy in the valley.

We are also unpacking from a move again, but unlike 2010, we didn’t have to do any immediate renovations on our new home which has been a welcome respite from home demo and remodeling.  Our 1885 house in Geneva, was finished only a week before we left NY and was sold to its new owners who were super excited to not have to do anything to it.

Finger Lakes

The Finger Lakes have had a very unusual growing season as is usual in the area.  I’m not sure if we can even say that upstate NY has a “typical” growing season.  Every year comes with its own surprises.  About the only thing you can count on in the Finger Lakes is you will come to a point where you have to gamble your crop and suddenly I think of Clint Eastwood in Dirty Harry.  “Do I feel lucky? Well, do ya, punk?”

2018 has been no exception.  On August 14th, 5 inches of rain fell over much of the area with some localized rain up to 9 inches.  Many homes were devastated and erosion was a problem in many vineyards in the worst hit areas.  Luckily for most of the varieties it was still early enough that the fruit wasn’t compromised.  The next wave came from Hurricane Florence remnants which dropped around 1 inch of rain around mid September but was no where near as bad as it could have been.  This caused some botrytis issues, particularly in Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.  We picked our Trestle Thirty One Chardonnay on Monday, September 24.  The hand crew did a fantastic job of sorting in the field and we ended up with a small but delicious crop of Chardonnay with beautiful chemistry.  It is currently bubbling away during fermentation and should be finished within a few days.

Then we turned our attention to Riesling.  The almost continuous daily showers have made this a challenging year for winemakers and growers alike.  Everyone has their own way of dealing with this type of season but we are taking the gamble and hanging the fruit.  The vineyard managers have done a great job of sending in crews to drop the fruit that has turned sour and leaving only the clean fruit.  I anticipate another pass close to harvest and then the hand harvesting will clean out whatever compromised fruit the first two passes may have missed.

At this point, I am doing my normal stalking of all the online weather information and have accuweather pages up for both Napa and Geneva, NY.  The main goal, realistically the only goal, is to make the best wine possible from both regions.  It’s been a fun harvest so far and I’m sure the best is yet to come.

Winemaker 2 Winemaker: Stephen Dooley

 

This month’s Winemaker 2 Winemaker interview travels back to California’s Central Coast to visit with winemaker Stephen Dooley.  Stephen grew up in the upper Midwest and attended Mankato State University and the University of California, Davis, to earn a degree in Enology. He spent 10 years making wine in the Napa Valley, two harvests “down under” in South Africa and Australia, before arriving the Edna Valley, where he worked for others for seven years, and then launched Stephen Ross in 1994. He met his wife, Paula, in 1989 and they married in 1995.  They work together on the Stephen Ross wines.

NC: What got you interested in wine initially?

SD: My curiosity for winemaking started in high school when I experimented with making wine in my mother’s basement in Minnesota. While in college there, I was entranced by a TIME Magazine article, and learned that one could study winemaking and do this for a living.  I transferred to the University of California at Davis to earn a degree in enology and have been practicing my craft of winemaking ever since.

NC: Did you have a person or people in your early career that really inspired your winemaking style? Who were they and why?

 SD: After graduating, I started working in Napa Valley at the Louis M. Martini Winery in 1977 and spent the next decade there – taking some time off to work harvests “down under”.   Coming from the Midwest, I was already instilled with a strong work ethic. Louis Martini himself demonstrated that ethic in action. Despite having handed the reins to his son, he worked at the winery every day, into his old age.  One of Louis’ maxims was “balanced into the bottle, balanced out of the bottle”.  The key to aging is balance, and I incorporate that into every wine I make.

I moved to California’s Central Coast in 1987 when I became the winemaker and general manager for Edna Valley Vineyards, which at that time was owned by the Chalone Wine Group. CWG’s Dick Graff was my boss and he was so enthusiastic and knowledgeable about quality winemaking, that I consider him a mentor.

NC: You and your wife run your winery together. What challenges come with that and what advantages do you think you have?

SD: Paula and I consider ourselves one of the luckiest married work teams ever. We get to work together every day, with our passionate and dedicated crew, to produce unique and interesting high-quality wines.  My role at Stephen Ross is winemaker, repairman, salesman…you name it.  I am the owner, so I wear many hats. Paula wears more of the business hat in the office and oversees Direct to Consumer Sales. We’re a great balance and cannot imagine doing it any other way.

 NC: What is your winemaking philosophy in Haiku?

SD: California coast

Burgundian traditions

Mother Nature’s art

 NC: Your winery is in the Central Coast of CA. What do you see as the biggest challenge facing the industry there?

SD: I think we have the same main challenge as wine regions and other agriculture sectors throughout the state: The continuing drought is number one, and then sourcing crews to align timing of picking is always tricky. We have been working with most of our vineyard partners for years and are intimately familiar with the fruit and when to pick, but it’s something I spend a lot of time thinking about.

All of the grapes we grow or purchase are either from our SIP Certified estate vineyard, Stone Corral, in the Edna Valley, or other local SIP Certified or organic vineyards, all who share a commitment to ethical farming practices and high-quality grape growing.

 NC: You make a number of different wines for your winery under the Stephen Ross label and the Flying Cloud label.  How did you come up with this business structure and how do you describe the difference between the two?

SD: We launched Flying Cloud in 2003 to focus on a suite of Bordeaux varietals including Cabernet Sauvignon, Sauvignon Blanc, Zinfandel and a red blend based on Pinot Noir, Syrah, Grenache and Petite Sirah. I wanted to experiment with great fruit from surrounding AVAs that didn’t fit the Burgundian program of Stephen Ross Wine Cellars.

Flying Cloud wines are popular because they absolutely over-deliver on quality at a value-driven price point. The wines have wholesale distribution and are also available in several states through the website, mailing list, and tasting room.

 NC: What was the best piece of winemaking advice you ever received?

SD: That is quite a question.  I am always seeking ideas and learning from my winemaker friends.  We have regular, healthy, open exchanges of ideas and practices, which I think is unusual in most industries.  In my decades of winemaking, I have gotten many “best pieces” of advice.

NC: Would you add anything to that advice which you could give people just starting out in the industry?

SD: My advice to those embarking on a winemaking career is to be prepared to work very hard, and to be patient.  Taste as many wines and as often as you can – form tasting groups, seek new things, ask questions.  And, to those starting new brands, winemaking is less than half the battle, you have to go sell your wine, too.

 NC: If you could live in another wine region (outside of your own), which would you choose and why?

SD: Another really big question.  Burgundy is fascinating with its history.  I love the Willamette Valley in Oregon, but it is too rainy for my wife.  We both love Italy and its great weather, food and wine.   When it comes down to it, it is very hard to contemplate leaving San Luis Obispo. It’s just about perfect here.    

How it Feels to be a Master of Wine

I’ve taken a long time to write this post.  When I first found out way back in September that I had finally finished what I had been working towards tirelessly for 8 long years, it was somewhat surreal.

My sister, her husband, and my nephew were in town visiting with us.  It was Sunday night before Labor day and we were up late, enjoying each other’s company, drinking wine, and playing cards.  I knew the call was coming but I didn’t know when nor did I know the outcome.  When my phone rang it was an unknown number calling me at 11pm at night.  I answered and heard Penny Richard’s voice on the other end.

“Nova, you’ve done it! You are a Master of Wine.”

I numbly listened to the rest of the conversation replying with “Thank you”s and “Yes I understand” to the instructions that Penny was giving me.  I hung up the phone and got to work on signing the code of conduct and taking care of some business aspects that no one really prepares you for.  I then calmly went back to playing cards after being hugged all around and opening a bottle of Champagne I had set aside for just such an occasion.  It really didn’t feel real.  Almost immediately I began receiving congratulatory emails from the international MW community.  It was amazing but also daunting.  I replied to everyone eventually with my heartfelt thanks but it did take me some time.  The overwhelming and immediate support you get from the veteran MWs is amazing!

The Tuesday after Labor day, I went back to work.  I was inexplicably changed however it seemed that life, in its crazy, strange way, was infuriatingly normal.  This was such a bizarre feeling.  As if I was going around living someone else’s life for a time.  Then I began to receive interview requests as word began to trickle out into the general industry news.  This is when it started to feel more real.  As more and more people found out I began to hear from many old and current acquaintances, friends, and colleagues.  Many months of congratulations ensued leading up to the graduation in London in November of last year.

I was excited to return to London.  I had been there several times before both for work and pleasure and it’s always a fun city to visit.  We splurged on a hotel across the river from Big Ben and took our son on his first international adventure.  It was about spending time together and reconnecting as a family after so many years of hard work towards this goal.  We only had a few short days in London and I wanted to make the most of it with my family. We did all the standard touristy stuff including the London eye (which we could see up close and personally from our hotel room, the Tower of London, and a river cruise.  My son, to this day still asks when we are going to go back.

The Master of Wine Ceremony was and will remain one of the greatest highlights of my life.  I had to arrive early to the Vintner’s Hall for a briefing on the Institute and rehearsal for how things would go.   Walking into that historic building was the first real sense that I had accomplished something really astounding.  My seat was labeled with a sign proudly proclaiming “Nova Cadamatre MW”.  We took pictures all together, with family, and with members of the Institute then attended a reception prior to the ceremony itself.  My son, being newly 5 years old, still jet lagged, and over stimulated from the busy day, decided that was the time he wanted to take a nap and only I would do for that task.  There I was, in a moment that was once in a lifetime surrounded by so many amazing people that I would have loved to talk to with Champagne flowing, sitting in a corner with my child resting his head on my shoulder lightly snoring, remembering that regardless of what I accomplish in my life and professional career my most important role is that of “Mama” and nothing else comes before that.

“The roar that came up from the group was the most amazing experience.  It was deafening, echoing off the gilded walls and shaking the very rafters of the historical building.”

He woke up in time for me to line up for the ceremony.  We lined up at the back of the Hall as our guests and well wishers found seats and settled in.  As they announced us as the new MWs, we entered the back of the hall.  The roar that came up from the group was the most amazing experience.  It was deafening, echoing off the gilded walls and shaking the very rafters of the historical building.  Cheers, applause, whistles, congratulatory nods, smiles, and winks from those who I could briefly catch the eye of.  I wish I had thought to have someone video tape that moment we all walked down the aisle as new Masters of Wine.  It was unbelievable.

Then hearing your biography read as you approached the stage to gather your certificate, you can’t help but to reflect over the time that you worked for this moment.  The days and nights tasting and studying.  The moments on the weekends where you chose to do a practice exam rather than relaxing.  The money spent on tuition, wines, and travel. The dedication and sacrifice of time that it takes to accomplish something of this magnitude.  Those moments of dark times when you feel like the goal is so far away that it is almost unreachable.  Every person who ever told you you couldn’t do it and every person who told you that you could.  All of it floods into you as you rise to walk up to the stage as the final steps to your goal.  Even when they called my name as the winner of the Taransaud award, I was a bit in shock. It still didn’t really feel as though it were real.  It felt very dreamlike and although the magnitude was beginning to dawn on me it was far from normal for me at that point.

Finally, after the pomp and circumstance fades and you begin to adjust to life after MW, you realize that it was worth it and it is real.  I attended my first seminar as an MW in January in San Francisco.  I stood at the back of the room with my fellow MWs and realized that I had truly made it.  It wasn’t until that moment when I fully felt the journey was complete.  I had made it to the “other side of the table” and that was where I was meant to be.  I get to now look forward to a lifetime with the title of MW, which is so exciting.  I’m sure as the decades move forward, the 8 years it took me to achieve this, seeming so long in the moment, will feel like mere days as the full extent of the title, which  I am still discovering, unfolds during my life.

To my fellow MWs, I’m so excited to be among you.  Thank you for your support!

To people aspiring to walk down that same amazing aisle in London, the best advice I can give you is never give up.

Have faith in yourself, always believe it is possible, and be prepared to work hard and sacrifice for what you want.